2015 New York Safe Boating - 16

EQUIPMENT

	You're boating when air or water temperatures are

If you are using a fully inflatable PFD, check the cylinder
and lanyard before each use. You should also review the
manufacturer's instructions for establishing a maintenance
schedule.

colder than 60°F

	You're boating in a congested area
	You're proceeding at high speed
	You're boating alone
	You're tired or sleepy or returning at the end of the day
	You're swimming off your boat or entering the water

Periodically, at least once in the beginning of the season and
once at the end, test a PFD in shallow water. To determine
whether it has sufficient buoyancy to keep you safely afloat,
keep arms and legs below the water's surface and assume a
relaxed	position.		Your	head	and	chin	should	be	above	the	
water's surface. If the device cannot keep you in this position,
replace it.

for any reason

	You're standing in a small boat for any reason
	You're a non-swimmer

Infants and PFD

Wear Requirements for
Personal Flotation Devices

The US Coast Guard recommends that infants should not
be on board watercraft until they are of a size that they can
wear an appropriate PFD. While there are several vest-type
PFDs approved for infants, they may not be suitable for very
small infants. Because of varying body types, and individual
temperament and comfort in the water, it is difficult to make
a PFD that is satisfactory for all infants. An infant PFD should
be tested on the child in a pool before boarding a boat. If
an infant is on board, an adult with a PFD on, ready to assist,
should also be aboard. In the event of an emergency, there
may not be time for an adult to get and put on a PFD while
taking care of an infant.

Although every boat must have a PFD for every passenger on
board, not everyone is required to wear a PFD all the time.
Some people are required to wear a PFD at all times. If a
person is required to wear a PFD, it must be the proper size
and all straps, zippers, and buckles must be fastened in order
to meet that requirement.

Here are the legal requirements for
wearing PFDs:

REMEMBER, ANYTIME IS THE RIGHT TIME TO
WEAR YOUR PFD!

Children under the age of twelve must wear a USCG
approved PFD onboard a pleasure boat under 65 feet,
rowboat, canoe, or kayak while underway unless they are in a
fully enclosed cabin. The PFD must be the appropriate size for
the child.

Visual Distress Signals (VDS)

You need to be properly prepared for an emergency, which
means you must know how to get help, and when to offer
help. All boaters should learn to how to signal others when
they are in trouble on the water, and should know how to
recognize the visual distress signals of others. When boaters
use visual distress signals properly, searchers can locate a
boat in difficulty more quickly, reducing the possibility of a
minor	emergency	becoming	a	tragedy.	NEVER	display	visual	
distress	signals	on	the	water	under	any	circumstances	except	
when you need assistance to prevent immediate or potential
danger	to	persons	on	board.	Some	examples	are	your	boat	is	
disabled, a medical emergency on board, taking on water, or
a fire.

Anyone operating or riding on a personal watercraft
(Jet Ski, Wave Runner, or similar craft) must wear a USCG
approved PFD.
Anyone being towed behind a boat, such as water skiers,
tubers, parasailers, etc., must wear a PFD. If you are in a
disabled boat being towed by another boat, it is a good idea
for everyone on board to wear their PFD (although in this case
it is not a legal requirement).
Everyone on board any vessel of less than 21 feet, including
rowboats, canoes and kayaks, between November first and
May first must wear a USCG approved PFD while underway.

Visual	Distress	Signals	are	classified	in	two	categories	"day	
signals"	and	"night	signals."		Some	VDS	are	approved	for	
both. The signals must be in serviceable condition and readily
accessible onboard the boat. The visual distress signals must
comply with US Coast Guard requirements. Some visual
distress signals become less effective over time; any devices
that	are	marked	with	a	service	life	must	not	have	expired.

Best Practices for
Personal Floatation Devices

Consider wearing your PFD whenever you're on or near the
water. A PFD is a lifesaver. Just because you don't have
to wear your PFD in a certain situation doesn't mean you
shouldn't. There are many times that it makes good safety
sense	to	put	on	your	PFD.		For	example,	it's	always	best	to	
wear your PFD if:

Visual	distress	signals	may	be	either	pyrotechnic	or	nonpyrotechnic. Pyrotechnic means a device that burns with
colored flames. Non-pyrotechnic visual distress signals do
not burn. Each type of distress signal has distinct advantages
and disadvantages, and no single device is ideal under all
conditions or suitable for all purposes.

	You	want	to	set	a	good	example	for	children
	You're loading or unloading from a dock
	You're boating in rain, fog, sleet, snow, darkness, or
experiencing	high	winds	or	rough	waters

16



2015 New York Safe Boating

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of 2015 New York Safe Boating

Contents
2015 New York Safe Boating - Cover1
2015 New York Safe Boating - Cover2
2015 New York Safe Boating - Contents
2015 New York Safe Boating - 1
2015 New York Safe Boating - 2
2015 New York Safe Boating - 3
2015 New York Safe Boating - 4
2015 New York Safe Boating - 5
2015 New York Safe Boating - 6
2015 New York Safe Boating - 7
2015 New York Safe Boating - 8
2015 New York Safe Boating - 9
2015 New York Safe Boating - 10
2015 New York Safe Boating - 11
2015 New York Safe Boating - 12
2015 New York Safe Boating - 13
2015 New York Safe Boating - 14
2015 New York Safe Boating - 15
2015 New York Safe Boating - 16
2015 New York Safe Boating - 17
2015 New York Safe Boating - 18
2015 New York Safe Boating - 19
2015 New York Safe Boating - 20
2015 New York Safe Boating - 21
2015 New York Safe Boating - 22
2015 New York Safe Boating - 23
2015 New York Safe Boating - 24
2015 New York Safe Boating - 25
2015 New York Safe Boating - 26
2015 New York Safe Boating - 27
2015 New York Safe Boating - 28
2015 New York Safe Boating - 29
2015 New York Safe Boating - 30
2015 New York Safe Boating - 31
2015 New York Safe Boating - 32
2015 New York Safe Boating - 33
2015 New York Safe Boating - 34
2015 New York Safe Boating - 35
2015 New York Safe Boating - 36
2015 New York Safe Boating - 37
2015 New York Safe Boating - 38
2015 New York Safe Boating - 39
2015 New York Safe Boating - 40
2015 New York Safe Boating - 41
2015 New York Safe Boating - 42
2015 New York Safe Boating - 43
2015 New York Safe Boating - 44
2015 New York Safe Boating - 45
2015 New York Safe Boating - 46
2015 New York Safe Boating - 47
2015 New York Safe Boating - 48
2015 New York Safe Boating - 49
2015 New York Safe Boating - 50
2015 New York Safe Boating - 51
2015 New York Safe Boating - 52
2015 New York Safe Boating - 53
2015 New York Safe Boating - 54
2015 New York Safe Boating - 55
2015 New York Safe Boating - 56
2015 New York Safe Boating - 57
2015 New York Safe Boating - 58
2015 New York Safe Boating - 59
2015 New York Safe Boating - 60
2015 New York Safe Boating - 61
2015 New York Safe Boating - 62
2015 New York Safe Boating - 63
2015 New York Safe Boating - 64
2015 New York Safe Boating - 65
2015 New York Safe Boating - 66
2015 New York Safe Boating - 67
2015 New York Safe Boating - 68
2015 New York Safe Boating - 69
2015 New York Safe Boating - 70
2015 New York Safe Boating - 71
2015 New York Safe Boating - 72
2015 New York Safe Boating - 73
2015 New York Safe Boating - 74
2015 New York Safe Boating - 75
2015 New York Safe Boating - 76
2015 New York Safe Boating - 77
2015 New York Safe Boating - 78
2015 New York Safe Boating - 79
2015 New York Safe Boating - 80
2015 New York Safe Boating - 81
2015 New York Safe Boating - 82
2015 New York Safe Boating - 83
2015 New York Safe Boating - 84
2015 New York Safe Boating - Cover4
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com