2015 New York Safe Boating - 18

EQUIPMENT

Fire Extinguishers

Types of extinguishers

The	two	most	common	types	of	fire	extinguishers	are	dry	
chemical	and	carbon	dioxide	(CO2).	Dry	chemical	and	
carbon	dioxide	extinguishers	can	be	effective	on	fires	
caused by common combustibles (Class A), such as wood
and paper, flammable liquids (Class B), such as fuel or
grease and electrical fires (class C). Never use water on
class B or C fires. For common combustibles (class A) both
dry	chemical	and	carbon	dioxide	may	be	used	but	should	
be followed up with water to help prevent re-flash.

US	Coast	Guard	Approved	fire	extinguishers	are	required	
on	boats	where	a	fire	hazard	could	be	expected	from	the	
motors or the fuel system. Non-mechanically propelled boats
are	not	required	to	carry	a	fire	extinguisher,	nor	are	personal	
watercraft.
To be approved it must be mounted, such as near the helm
where it is easily accessible to the operator, in a marinetype	mounting	bracket	designed	for	the	extinguisher.		Fire	
extinguishers	that	do	not	satisfy	the	requirements	or	that	have	
been partially discharged are not compliant with the law. You
must	replace	a	partially	discharged	extinguisher	or	take	it	to	a	
qualified	fire	extinguisher	servicing	company	for	recharge.

Extinguisher	labels	can	be	confusing.		Fire	extinguishers	
are classified by a symbol that is comprised of a letter and
a Roman numeral. The letter indicates the type of fire
the	extinguisher	is	approved	for,	and	the	Roman	numeral	
indicates	the	size	of	the	extinguisher.		Look	for	the	part	
of the label that says "Marine Type US COAST GUARD
APPROVED."		Most	portable	extinguishers	will	be	either	
size I or II. Size III and larger are too big for use on most
recreational boats.

BECOME FAMILIAR WITH THE EXTINGUISHER
AND LEARN HOW TO USE IT BEFORE YOU
NEED IT. READ THE LABEL AND INSTRUCTIONS
CAREFULLY!

Fire extinguisher maintenance

Boats with inboard engines
are more susceptible to fires
because the engine space is
enclosed. The operator may
not see fuel leaks or recognize
other	potentially	explosive	
conditions as they develop,
and it's possible for a fire to
take hold without the operator
being aware of it. Operators
of gasoline inboard powered
boats should consider installing
an	automatic	fixed	extinguishing	system	in	order	to	reduce	
the danger of fire. Don't forget to ventilate the engine space.
Blow out any flammable vapors out of the bilge by running the
blower a minimum of four minutes before starting the engine.

Devote	some	time	to	caring	for	your	fire	extinguishers	
properly, and they can last many years. To be sure that
your	fire	extinguisher	will	work	properly	when	you	need	it,	
inspect	your	extinguishers	monthly.		Make	sure	that:

	Seals and tamper indicators are not broken or
missing

	Pressure gauges or indicators read in the operable
range	(Note:	CO2	extinguishers	do	not	have	
gauges.)

	There is no visual damage such as cracked or

broken hoses, rust, corrosion, leakage or clogged
nozzles

There	will	be	a	minimum	weight	on	the	extinguisher	label,	
and	you	need	to	assure	that	your	extinguisher	remains	at	
the minimum weight. Make sure of this by weighing your
extinguishers	every	year.

Some	boats	are	fitted	with	a	fixed	US	COAST	GUARD	
APPROVED	fire	extinguishing	system	that	protects	the	engine	
compartment. These boats may not need to carry as many
portable	fire	extinguishers	as	shown	on	the	chart	below.

If	you	have	doubts	about	your	fire	extinguisher,	never	
test it to see if it works. Instead, have it inspected by
a professional to determine if it is reliable and in good
working order.

Minimum number of hand portable fire
extinguishers required
Boat Length

No	Fixed	
System

Less than 26'

1 B-I

0

26' to less than 40'

2 B-I or 1
B-II

1 B-I

40' to 65'

3 B-I or 1
B-II & 1 B-1

2 B-I or 1 B-II

Outboards Less Than 26' and
of Open Construction *

NA

Backfire Flame Arrestor

With approved
Fixed	Systems

NA

All gasoline engines with carburetors tend to vent fuel
vapor after shutdown. This vapor goes into the engine
compartment and will linger for a while. The vapor does
no harm as long as there is no source of ignition in the
compartment. Sources of ignition can be electric such as
a spark, or a backfire in the engine intake system when
you start an engine. On a boat, flames spouting out of a
carburetor can ignite fuel vapor in an engine compartment.
A backfire flame arrestor prevents the heat and flames of an
engine backfire from igniting any flammable vapors that may
be present in the engine compartment. A backfire flame
arrestor is required on all inboard gasoline engines, and must

*Open construction is a boat built with no closed compartments or
compartments under seats where portable fuel tanks may be stored
and no deck under which vapors can accumulate.

18



2015 New York Safe Boating

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of 2015 New York Safe Boating

Contents
2015 New York Safe Boating - Cover1
2015 New York Safe Boating - Cover2
2015 New York Safe Boating - Contents
2015 New York Safe Boating - 1
2015 New York Safe Boating - 2
2015 New York Safe Boating - 3
2015 New York Safe Boating - 4
2015 New York Safe Boating - 5
2015 New York Safe Boating - 6
2015 New York Safe Boating - 7
2015 New York Safe Boating - 8
2015 New York Safe Boating - 9
2015 New York Safe Boating - 10
2015 New York Safe Boating - 11
2015 New York Safe Boating - 12
2015 New York Safe Boating - 13
2015 New York Safe Boating - 14
2015 New York Safe Boating - 15
2015 New York Safe Boating - 16
2015 New York Safe Boating - 17
2015 New York Safe Boating - 18
2015 New York Safe Boating - 19
2015 New York Safe Boating - 20
2015 New York Safe Boating - 21
2015 New York Safe Boating - 22
2015 New York Safe Boating - 23
2015 New York Safe Boating - 24
2015 New York Safe Boating - 25
2015 New York Safe Boating - 26
2015 New York Safe Boating - 27
2015 New York Safe Boating - 28
2015 New York Safe Boating - 29
2015 New York Safe Boating - 30
2015 New York Safe Boating - 31
2015 New York Safe Boating - 32
2015 New York Safe Boating - 33
2015 New York Safe Boating - 34
2015 New York Safe Boating - 35
2015 New York Safe Boating - 36
2015 New York Safe Boating - 37
2015 New York Safe Boating - 38
2015 New York Safe Boating - 39
2015 New York Safe Boating - 40
2015 New York Safe Boating - 41
2015 New York Safe Boating - 42
2015 New York Safe Boating - 43
2015 New York Safe Boating - 44
2015 New York Safe Boating - 45
2015 New York Safe Boating - 46
2015 New York Safe Boating - 47
2015 New York Safe Boating - 48
2015 New York Safe Boating - 49
2015 New York Safe Boating - 50
2015 New York Safe Boating - 51
2015 New York Safe Boating - 52
2015 New York Safe Boating - 53
2015 New York Safe Boating - 54
2015 New York Safe Boating - 55
2015 New York Safe Boating - 56
2015 New York Safe Boating - 57
2015 New York Safe Boating - 58
2015 New York Safe Boating - 59
2015 New York Safe Boating - 60
2015 New York Safe Boating - 61
2015 New York Safe Boating - 62
2015 New York Safe Boating - 63
2015 New York Safe Boating - 64
2015 New York Safe Boating - 65
2015 New York Safe Boating - 66
2015 New York Safe Boating - 67
2015 New York Safe Boating - 68
2015 New York Safe Boating - 69
2015 New York Safe Boating - 70
2015 New York Safe Boating - 71
2015 New York Safe Boating - 72
2015 New York Safe Boating - 73
2015 New York Safe Boating - 74
2015 New York Safe Boating - 75
2015 New York Safe Boating - 76
2015 New York Safe Boating - 77
2015 New York Safe Boating - 78
2015 New York Safe Boating - 79
2015 New York Safe Boating - 80
2015 New York Safe Boating - 81
2015 New York Safe Boating - 82
2015 New York Safe Boating - 83
2015 New York Safe Boating - 84
2015 New York Safe Boating - Cover4
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com