Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 30

Information Technology
year, and our verification tests have shown
that we can typically raise the quality of a
file by 20 percentage points. We can then
benchmark the quality level of the existing
database, and an MDM manager can
calculate an ROI in terms of improved sales
team accuracy."
MedPro (which stresses its linkage to any
MDM software) highlights its linkage with
Concur, a popular resource for recording
and tracking travel expenses and other
field-rep activities; MedPro was declared
"App Center Partner of the Year" in 2017
by that firm. (Veeva and other CRM players
also interact with Concur.) "Typically, a rep
will record a recent doctor's office visit in
Concur, and by hitting one button, that
HCP's location and licensing information
will be automatically populated with the
latest MedPro data," says Ungemach.
Although location and certifications
are often considered commoditized-
undifferentiated parts of MDM reference
data, in fact-the topic continues to cause
worry for data managers. A notable irritant
is the reporting for aggregate spending
under the US's Open Payments system, and
the now-established transparency standards
in the EU. In the US, agg spend reporting is
fairly settled; when CMS published the 2016
data on June 30, there was barely notice
taken in the popular press. (ProPublica, an
investigative journalism organization that
had been publishing a "Dollars for Docs"
report even before Open Payments, did not

update its reporting this year.)
For the record, the industry reported
$8.18 billion being spent on physicians
and healthcare organizations and related
revenue transfers; it was up by a mere 1.1%
from the $8.09 billion reported in 2015.
(The 2015 figure was revised based on later
analysis by CMS; the original figure was
$7.49 billion.) Of that, $2.8 billion was
spent on "general" payments (this would
include most sales-rep expenditures), but
that hardly budged from the $2.68 billion
spent in 2015.
A key MDM element of agg spend
reporting is the National Provider Identifier
(NPI) number of physicians; but here's
where such reporting gets complicated: this
year, the state of Ohio established a new
rule for its so-called Terminal Distributor of
Dangerous Drugs (TDDD) program, which
is a licensing registration for who handles
most types of prescription medicines (the
definition of a "dangerous drug" is one that
is only available by prescription). Now,
not only is the physician responsible for
receiving a drug required to be identified
to the state, but also the specific location
w here the sample was dropp ed off.
"Doctors maintain multiple offices, so now
you need to correlate who received the
sample with the location of the physician,"
notes MedPro's Ungemach. "It's essentially
temporarily shut down sampling in that
state until pharma companies' databases
have this information collated."

Fig. 2. Departmental affiliations of managers concerned with agg-spend reporting

Fig. 3. Technology choices for agg-spend reporting

Patient data saves lives
By Jim Cushman, Veeva Systems

According to Veeva
OpenData, the life
sciences industry has
expanded its capacity to
treat patients addicted
to pain killers by 91%.
How e ve r, t r e a t m e n t
center coverage remains
uneven in the hardest-hit rural communities
where emergency services may be limited,
treatment options sparse, and more people
endure chronic pain from working in
labor-intensive occupations. If life sciences
companies were equipped with such up-todate patient data, they could more closely
match the rapidly evolving needs of patient
communities and promote treatment
options to healthcare professionals (HCPs)
serving these deficient areas.
Project Lazarus (www.projectlazarus.
org) is an example where data empowered
organizations to swiftly redirect efforts to
help thousands of patients recover from
the misuse of opioids in an underserved
area. The community of Wilkes County,
NC in the foothills of the Appalachian
Mountains has fewer than 70,000 residents,
but the third-highest prescription opioid
overdose rate in the nation. Project Lazarus
encourages cross-sector collaboration,

promotes public and provider education,
and focuses on increasing access to
treatment. Purdue Pharma, schooled in
the patient data, invested in the program
and helped cut the overdose rate in Wilkes
County by 72% over three years.
A complete view of the patient
No single system can-nor should-
maintain the universe of patient information
as well as the patient's relationships with
doctors, specialists, current prescriptions,
healthcare payer and plan. To get the most
benefit from patient data, it must be made
accessible in multiple systems. To do this,
all data points must be 'related' to one
another, which requires each patient to be
assigned a unique identifier, but this process
can become very complicated. Traditional
approaches are not sufficient for today's
large quantities of multifaceted healthcare
data.
Modern data management applications
solve this problem by linking patient data
across an organization's IT landscape, which
ensures data consistency among systems.
This advanced technology relates all patient
data so that when it changes, the change is
reflected instantly across all systems. Unlike
other types of data technology, MDM

30 Visit our website at www.PharmaceuticalCommerce.com September | October 2017

can also manage multiple data sources,
structured and unstructured data, and
inconsistently formatted data.
MDM also provides additional
c a p a b i l i t i e s f o r d a t a q u a l i t y, d a t a
stewardship, survivorship rules, access
rights and other data governance needs,
and can centralize it all for consistency
around the world. Queries aggregate data
across multiple systems while cloud-based
solutions capture data changes in real
time to form a reliable, 360-degree view of
patients. With this comprehensive view, life
sciences companies can finely target their
marketing, personalize care, and promote
treatments where they are needed most.
Data governance
One global pharmaceutical company
has initiated a pilot program to more
fully leverage patient data to build closer
relationships with them and their caregivers.
However, with numerous entry points and
channels, the data is too easily fragmented
and ungoverned. The company is turning
to MDM to match, link, cleanse, validate
and standardize patient information and to
accurately relate patients with their HCPs,
insurance companies and products with the
ultimate goal of improving patient care.

MDM is esp ecial ly b eneficial for
long-term care patients like the growing
population of baby boomers, oncology
p a t i e n t s a n d op i o i d a d d i c t s . Hi g h touch specialists who treat these chronic
conditions can dramatically improve their
quality of care knowing key information
about patients, such as their primary
care physician and specialists, hospital
preference, other prescriptions, payer plan,
and approved products on the payer's
formulary. And drug companies that share
patient data with prescribers can engage
in a more collaborative relationship with
doctors and help them adjust treatment
accordingly.
Additionally, as more patients start using
wearable or injectable devices, valuable realworld adherence data (i.e., time of day a dose
is taken, dosage amount, frequency) can also
be shared and inform treating physicians.
This could have powerful implications for
patients taking ongoing medications, such
as those with Type II diabetes. Life sciences
companies that can effectively manage and
provide this type of master patient data
to HCPs in combination with treatment
information foster rich partnerships with
doctors in the battle against disease.


http://www.projectlazarus.org http://www.projectlazarus.org http://www.PharmaceuticalCommerce.com

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017

Table of Contents
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - Cover1
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - Cover2
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - Table of Contents
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 4
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 5
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 6
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 7
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 8
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 9
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 10
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 11
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 12
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 13
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 14
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 15
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 16
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 17
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 18
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 19
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 20
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 21
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 22
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 23
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 24
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 25
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 26
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 27
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 28
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 29
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 30
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 31
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 32
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 33
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - 34
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - Cover3
Pharmaceutical Commerce - September/October 2017 - Cover4
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