SEAHO Report - Summer 2021 - 32

FEATURE ARTICLES
Picture it: your house, fall 2020.
You have acquired a snake plant (think of the identity markers for the most dominant identity in your
organization) , a monstera (think of the identity markers for the second most dominant identity in your
organization) and a fiddle leaf fig (think of the identity markers of one of the least dominant identities in
your organization). You've purchased a bag of soil (orientation and onboarding), liquid fertilizer (training
and professional development), self-draining pots (an office, a laptop, and a roster) and a watering can (peer
positions, a supervisor, and a mentor). Upon arrival to your home (you hired all three), you have transferred the
plants into the new soil, with fertilizer (they made it through training and their email addresses work and they
are all on the right listservs), and you have watered them and set them up in your appointed space (they have
met as a large team, and the school year has begun) to begin their lives in this ecosystem.
In the first few weeks, each plant is adjusting. No plant has immediately died or fallen visibly into disrepair
(there have been no major performance issues, and they seem to be meeting all assumed touchpoints: attending
meetings, completing tasks, meeting with others, communicating, etc). But you begin to see immediate signs of
the variance their growth will take. Each of your plants receive similar approximate levels of sunlight, and you
water each on the same day, from the same can, with the same water in roughly the same amount (everyone has
the same 1:1 schedule, you gave everyone the same meeting notes, and they've all been here the same amount of
time). But your snake plant is already sprouting tiny new buds. Your monstera plant has started to lean toward
the light. Your fiddle leaf reports no damage, and has the same amount of leaves it started with. No new growth,
but no decline.
After a few months, you notice the weather beginning to change. There is less and less sunlight (there is
less recovery time between incidents, or it is a busy season for your organization), your watering schedule
has changed because of your own life's needs (you have relaxed your oversight, or do not provide training/
development as often, or the training season has simply ended), and the overall temperature and moisture levels
in your space are lower (attention has shifted away from the role/work and has moved toward student issues/
behavior). This makes sense. It's winter in the northern hemisphere, and the days are colder. All these changes
are natural, and you expect them to happen (they are still new to their role). But with those changes, your plants
experience change (your staff are having different experiences and it is affecting them as people). Your snake
plant -- bred over time to be robust, slow to change and universal to most environments -- is still doing well,
producing pups, not showing any decaying leaves and not outgrowing the pot in which it is placed (they are
behaving in ways consistent with your expectations and within the acceptable boundaries of your organization,
and the professional standards of the field, and they have not caused any alarm or concern from you). Your
monstera plant -- adaptable to the most common environments, longer leaf development process, and quick to
show signs of discontent and decay -- has sprouted leaves since you first acquired it, and has been re-potted
twice due, in part, to its overwhelm of the pot itself (they have expanded beyond their role and are now operating
both within and above their responsibilities, but in a way that infers or assumes positive growth). But your
fiddle leaf plant -- a much more intricately resourced plant, needing specific conditions for optimal success,
with a much faster decay process and a differently structured root ball -- has been dropping leaves, drooping,
and shows evidence of both over- and under-watering (they are showing you that they are not maintaining
their own stasis since being in the environment, and they are causing concern because of the lack of growth,
and potential regression). How do you have so much variance from three plants who received the same support, the same
conditions, and the same opportunity?
The answer is simple: it's because they are inherently different.
Each plant has its own nerve structure; its own leaf pattern; its own reproduction cycle; its own process of
absorbing nutrients; and its own process for survival, renewal, or eventual death. Each plant has its own ideal
light setting, its own optimum watering/fertilizing schedule, its own ideal pot type. Each plant has its own
relationship to other plants, and to human and animal interaction.
And each care-giver has their own intractable and natural inclinations, how they process information and
learning, how they adjust and respond to change, how they lead and mentor, how they understand success
and failure, and how they view the importance of variance and diversity. Each care-giver has their own
understanding of support, care, love, understanding, relationships.
It is foolish to expect a snake plant to grow at the same rate and in the same way you would expect a fiddle leaf
fig to grow. It is also foolish to expect that a snake plant and a monstera need the same conditions, support and
stimuli in order to thrive, or that because they are thriving, it is due to the same conditions or input. In the same
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SEAHO Report - Summer 2021

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of SEAHO Report - Summer 2021

Contents
SEAHO Report - Summer 2021 - 1
SEAHO Report - Summer 2021 - Contents
SEAHO Report - Summer 2021 - 3
SEAHO Report - Summer 2021 - 4
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https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2024winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2023fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2023summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2023spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2023winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2022winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2021fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2021summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2021spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2021winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2020holiday
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2020fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2020spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2020winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2019fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2019summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2019spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2019winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2018fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2018summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2018spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2018winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2017summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2017spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2017winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2016fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2016summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2016spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2016winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2015fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2015summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2015spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2015winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2014fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2014spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2014winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/50thanniversary
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2013fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2013summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2013spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2013winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2012fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2012summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/2012winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/seaho/spring2011
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com