Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 51


2 | They don't like some of the learning

methodologies.

Cultural intelligence has its own logic. If
a culture is better prepared for unsure,
abstract things, then people tend to
like more abstract methodologies,
such as models, books, brainstorming,
professional articles and discussions. On
the other hand, if a culture doesn't like
uncertainty, then learners would opt
for more concrete ways of learning like
lectures, tests, videos and case studies.
The U.S., Germany, and Singapore often
prefer more abstract ways, while Italy and
Brazil prefer more concrete ways. Essentially,
participants have a cultural relationship to
uncertainty, which corresponds to activities
where they feel most or least comfortable.
3 | They don't want to approach the corporate

trainer with questions or concerns.

This cultural orientation is called "power
distance," meaning how a culture views
the distance in power between people.
The American culture often sees the world
through the lens of everyone being equal,
while the Middle Eastern, Asian and Latin
American cultures experience the power
distance as a much greater factor. They
are used to hierarchy, where people are
more powerful than others. For learners in
these cultures, there is a natural inhibitor
to speaking with someone perceived to
be in a higher position of power. Overall,
participants reflect what is most comfortable
for them, and comfort levels vary.
4 | Some don't follow the rules that well.
This cultural orientation is called
"universalism" or "particularism," meaning
each culture's relationship with rules
and regulations. This cultural orientation
lends itself to not considering rules as
an absolute. It begs the issue of
appropriate flexibility.
The U.S. is a "universalist" culture,
where "no one is above the law." The
"particularist" cultures - such as Russia,
Thailand and China - prefer to circumvent
the rules and laws. For historical reasons,
they see it as a better option. These
cultures pay more attention to personal
obligations as opposed to the law itself.

5 | They don't respond as clearly as Americans do.
People tend to value and trust their own
cultural style of communication and
conflict management more. The degree
to which we can match a style promotes
greater receptivity on the participant side.
Here are two communication styles trainers
should consider when talking to learners:
* Direct communication: saying it like it
is. This style is often preferred in the U.S.
U.K., and Scandinavian countries.
* Indirect communication: positioning
the message to allow for purposeful
ambiguity. This style is prevalent in
Latin America, Asia, and Middle East.
Trainers must also assess the degree of
emotionality for the conversation:
* Emotional restraint. Some cultures
trust/value impersonal, detached and
objective communication more. This is
often preferred by the U.S., U.K., China,
Japan, and Thailand.
* Emotional expressiveness. Some cultures
trust/value
emotional,
passionate
and subjective communication more.
This style is often preferred by Arab
Countries, Italy, Spain Russia, Israel, and
Latin American countries.
6 | They don't seem as competitive as Americans.
This cultural orientation identifies how
people view their own identity - as an
individual or as a member of a family,
team or larger organization.
Americans see themselves as individuals
and look to themselves as the way to
solve problems. Self-help and selfreliance are cornerstones of American
culture. This is called "individualism"
because people function as individuals.
Competition has evolved as a way
to determine who is the best. In any
training simulation where there is a
challenge, Americans are "programmed"
to be as competitive as possible.
Many other cultures see their primary
identity as a member of a group. They
place their attention and loyalty to
the team first and foremost - not to

T R A I N I N G I N DUSTR Y MA GAZ INE - FALL20 1 6 I WWW.TRAININGI NDU S T RY . C OM/ MAGAZ I NE

themselves as individuals. This is called
"collectivism," meaning the collective
interests take precedence over their
own interests as individuals. In a training
simulation where there is a challenge,
they will opt to help the team compete
and not focus on themselves as an
individual competitor. People appear
less competitive as individuals. However,
they bring such a strength to team
competition and achievement.
Both individualism and collectivism
bring different strengths to a training
competition, or productivity in general.
This cultural orientation should be
discussed because if left unmanaged, it
can cause resentment.
7 | Sometimes they seem fearful or reticent to

take part in experiential activities.

This disconnect reverts back to a culture's
relationship to uncertainty in terms of risk
taking. In experiential training, people are
in the moment. Americans often learn in
the moment. They are culturally prepared
for risk taking - even if they fail, they
learn. With cultures wanting to avoid or
tightly manage risk, the "unknowing" side
of this type of training is problematic for
them. They are more cautious with taking
a risk and don't like to fail in the moment.
Ultimately, risk taking is culturally based.
Americans may view risk as "potential
gain," while other cultures can view risk as
"potential loss."
THE RULE FOR ENGAGEMENT
Cultural differences are complicated and
complex, and they come together in
multifaceted ways at the individual learner
level. The rule for engagement is simple:
Keep your mind open to new behaviors,
as they represent alternatives to your own
cultural environment for learning. Look for
the value that they bring.
Paula Swanson has a life-long passion/
interest in human behavior and provides
insights from the intersection of cultural
intelligence and personality type. She is
president of Interaction Analysts training
firm, and teaches business English at
Stafford House San Francisco. Email Paula.

| 51


http://www.trainingindustry.com/ezine.aspx

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016

Perspectives
Table of Contents
The Outcome of Engagement
Learning Outcomes: We Are Products of our Environment
Step Back and Disengage to Learn
Have Your Millennials Checked Out?
Performance versus Training: It Isn't Always a Training Issue
Mindfulness: A Critical Success Factor
Creating the Ideal Learning Environment
Passion in the Classroom: Can You Be a Sand Salesman?
The Leader as the Facilitator: How to Effectively Lead Knowledge Workers
Interaction Psychology: Why Characters, Clicks, Points and Badges Don't Translate
Learning Effectiveness by Design
Four Ways to Increase Learner Engagement
Open Badges: Reimagining the credential space
Bridging the Disconnect with Learners From Other Cultures
From Where I Sit
L&D’s Role in Moving the Needle on Employee Engagement
Deploying an After-Training Program
9 Ways to Get Business Leaders to Buy-in to Your Learning Efforts
Engaging Content Delivery for Coding Training
Company News
What's Online
Training Talk
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Intro
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Cover1
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Cover2
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Perspectives
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Table of Contents
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 5
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 6
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 7
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 8
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - The Outcome of Engagement
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 10
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Learning Outcomes: We Are Products of our Environment
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 12
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Step Back and Disengage to Learn
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 14
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Have Your Millennials Checked Out?
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Performance versus Training: It Isn't Always a Training Issue
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 17
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 18
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 19
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Mindfulness: A Critical Success Factor
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 21
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 22
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 23
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Creating the Ideal Learning Environment
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 25
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 26
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 27
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Passion in the Classroom: Can You Be a Sand Salesman?
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 29
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 30
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 31
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 32
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - The Leader as the Facilitator: How to Effectively Lead Knowledge Workers
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 34
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 35
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Interaction Psychology: Why Characters, Clicks, Points and Badges Don't Translate
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 37
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 38
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 39
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Learning Effectiveness by Design
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 41
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 42
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 43
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Four Ways to Increase Learner Engagement
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 45
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 46
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 47
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Open Badges: Reimagining the credential space
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 49
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Bridging the Disconnect with Learners From Other Cultures
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 51
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - From Where I Sit
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 53
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 54
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - L&D’s Role in Moving the Needle on Employee Engagement
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 56
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Deploying an After-Training Program
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 9 Ways to Get Business Leaders to Buy-in to Your Learning Efforts
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - 59
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Engaging Content Delivery for Coding Training
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Company News
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - What's Online
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Cover3
Training Industry Magazine - Fall 2016 - Cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20201112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20200910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20200708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20200506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20200304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20200102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20191112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20190910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20190708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20190506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20190304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20190102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20181112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20180910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20180708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20180506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20180304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20180102
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20171112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20170910
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20170708
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20170506
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20170304
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20171112_se
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_20161112
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2016fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2016summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2016sales
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2016spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2016winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2015outsourcing
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2015fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2015summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2015leadership
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2015spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2015winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2014fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2014summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2014spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2014winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2013fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2013summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2013spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2013winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2012fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2012summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2012spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2012winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2011fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2011summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2011spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2011winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2010fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2010summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2010spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2010winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2009fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2009summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2009spring
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2009winter
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2008fall
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2008summer
https://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/trainingindustry/tiq_2008spring
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com