CU Nursing - Fall/Winter 2019 - 15

15

RESEARCH

The program reaches rural areas of Colorado with high opioid overdose rates and
recently received $2.5 million by the state to expand.

for their chemotherapy treatments,"
she said of her first creative arts therapy
(CAT) study.

"We need to remove the blame and shame and understand more about why some
people become addicted to pain medications," Driscoll-Powers said. "Using standardized trauma-informed screening tools could reduce opioid use in this country
and help people already addicted receive better treatment," she said.

While their therapeutic drugs slowly
dripped into their veins, the children
would join in a circle, finger-painting, playing parachute and building
popsicle-stick sculptures, Raybin said.
"Or, sometimes, they'd beat on drums to
get their anger out."

SEEKING THE 'WHY' IN LACK OF HIV DRUG ADHERENCE
Nasser Al Salmi, RN, CNS (3rd place winner)
Lecturer, College of Nursing, Sultan Qaboos University - PhD program

Raybin upped her research with nearly 100
pediatric patients and their parents taking part in this poster-focused go-round.
Parent response suggested improved
quality of life for the children, but more
research is needed, she said.

When persons living with HIV forget or ignore taking their medication, the
consequences can go beyond not feeling well. Non-adherence can cause critical
complications, drug resistance and even death.
So PhD candidate Nasser Al Salmi and colleagues set out to answer the "why" so
many people living with HIV fail to follow their regimen, a proportion that falls
somewhere between 27% and 80% (depending on population and measure).

And she intends to continue her work,
especially as science keeps cancer patients
alive longer, Raybin said. "Anything that
supports them along the way is going to
make a difference." Her work is funded by
the American Cancer Society.

"When the rate is below 95 percent, it always leads to different complications, and
one is treatment resistance," Al Salmi said.
Many factors, from drug side effects to lack of transportation, can come between
patients and their medication adherence. For this study, al Salmi focused on
stress and its effects.

REMOVING BLAME & SHAME
IN OPIOID USE DISORDERS
Linda Driscoll Powers (2nd place winner)
BSN candidate May 2020 - Honors Program
A prevailing stigma surrounding substance
abuse disorders could cripple attempts at
reducing the opioid crisis in this country.
"Many people, including healthcare providers, see addiction as something wrong
with a person or a character defect rather
than the product of their life experience,"
Driscoll Powers said.
That was the premise of CU Nursing honors student Linda Driscoll Power's study
aimed at improving medical assessments
of patients with opioid use disorder (OUD)
through trauma-informed care.
Using data from a CU Nursing-led, statefunded pilot medication assisted therapy
(MAT) program, Driscoll Powers found,
among 476 participants receiving treatment for OUD: 23% reported lifetime
sexual abuse; 43% reported lifetime
physical abuse; and 58% reported lifetime
emotional abuse.

While the preliminary study cannot definitively link stress and drug adherence,
the results backed a model derived from a CU Nursing bio-behavioral group. The
"Two Minds Theory" suggests that low heart rate variability can be used to measure
stress, and that stress and fatigue influence daily adherence.
Lori Trego,
left, listens
as Rachel
JohnsonKoenke shares
her research.

Continued studies and individualized care are important, Al Salmi said, including
education on stress management and healthy habits.
"With good adherence, patients improve their biological and immunological response and reduce the risk of severe complications, including death," Al Salmi said.



CU Nursing - Fall/Winter 2019

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Contents
CU Nursing - Fall/Winter 2019 - Contents
CU Nursing - Fall/Winter 2019 - 2
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