Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 7

militants in Afghanistan began
using commercial drones that could
easily be purchased online. They
attached small explosive devices
to their drones, transforming them
into remotely piloted bombs.
These rogue drone deployments
created a layered challenge for
counterforces from the U.S. and other
western nations. They attempted to stop
the drones while operating in urban
and sensitive environments, where the
presence of civilians and non-military
infrastructure made the likelihood of
collateral damage significantly higher.
Kinetic counter-solutions, which involve
shooting down the drone, are risky
in urban environments. A projectile,
the plummeting metal drone, or
fractured pieces of metal can quickly
turn lethal in a crowded city filled with
innocent civilians. They can also risk
" friendly-fire " casualties in the fog of
asymmetrical warfare situations.
Jamming-based solutions, or
hybrid solutions featuring jammers
for mitigation, may affect radio
communications, which are critical
for soldiers. And jamming solutions
do not provide full control, as drone
operators can regain access to the
drone when the jamming ceases.
Moreover, even before mitigation
measures to defeat hostile drones,
there is the challenge of detection.
Here, traditional solutions are equally
problematic as the main component
of a counter-drone solution for today's
military forces. For detection, radars,
for example, generate false alarms
and noisy urban environments present
challenges for acoustic solutions.
Electro-optical C-sUASs require a clear
line-of-sight, which is often unavailable
due to buildings and other tall objects.
Tactical Technology
Today's battlefield requires a counterdrone
solution that is surgical and
innovative. It must be able to cope
with detection challenges around
tall buildings and other objects,
circumvent the challenges presented
by surrounding noise and radio
waves not emanating from rogue
UNMANNED SYSTEMS SPECIAL REPORT
Mitigation
drones, and distinguish between
authorized and adversarial drones.
An effective counter-drone solution
for militaries will also allow troops
to collect precious intelligence from
downed enemy drones. Kinetic
solutions, which damage UASs, destroy
that valuable intelligence and jammers
do not capture the drone or accurately
determine the pilot's location, leaving
military teams without many clues
for preventing future attacks.
Cyber-Takeover
Radio frequency-based, cybertakeover
counter-drone solutions resolve
these challenges and represent a step
forward in the evolution of C-sUASs.
These solutions detect unauthorized or
rogue drones, identify them, and then
take control, landing them in a safe
area, without generating false positives,
requiring line-of-sight, disrupting
communications systems, or causing
collateral damage. This technology
can passively scan and detect unique
com munication signals used by a
commercial drone, classify drones as
authorized or rogue, and decode the
telemetry signal to pinpoint the drone
takeoff position with GPS accuracy.
Militaries can designate certain
sUASs as authorized, so these drones
can continue to perform their vital
functions without interruption during
the rogue drone mitigation process.
Traditional Tech Does Not ProvideCompleteControl or Continuity
Flying Objects
False Positives
Radar
Detection
No GPS Location
DF
Acoustic
IneffectiveinNoisy Environments
Optical
No Clear Line - of
Sight
Signal Disruption
Collateral Damage
Mitigation
RadioControl &
GPS Jamming
d
t l
Kinetic
Less PopulatedEnvironments
SensitiveEnvironments
Sensitive EnvironmentsRequire a Next-Gen Approach
RadioFrequency (RF) Cyber-Detection
Detection
Outcome:
Fast & AccurateDetection
No FalsePositives
No Line-of-SightRequired
.
RF Cyber -Takeover
Outcome :
Disconnect,Takeover & Control
Safe Routetoa Safe Landing
Total Continuity:No Communication Disruption,
CollateralDamage, Stoppages,etc.
.
Today'sSensitive& Complex Environments
Confidential
FEBRUARY 2023 7

Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023

Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - Cov1
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - Cov2
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 1
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 2
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 3
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 4
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 5
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 6
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 7
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 8
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 9
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 10
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 11
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 12
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 13
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 14
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 15
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 16
Unmanned Systems Special Report. February 2023 - 17
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