ITE Journal May 2018 - 13

IMPROVING ARTERIAL ROADS TO SUPPORT PUBLIC
HEALTH: HOW CAN WE DO THIS?
of patent infringement." Carmanah adds that
it aims to continue advancing RRFB technology with the goal of increasing roadway
safety as more and more RRFBs are deployed
in crosswalks throughout the United States
and around the world.
"The ability to use RRFBs will undoubtedly
help reduce pedestrian and bicycle injuries
and deaths. We hope that the RRFB interim
approval may one day become a full inclusion in the MUTCD," said John Simmons,
Carmanah CEO. "Our vision is to be the global
leader in the signals industry, and one of the
traits of a good leader is knowing when to
take a stand for the benefit of all. We believe
in improving safety, and we believe in this
product: we could not stand by and do
nothing when technology with the proven
ability to save lives is at risk of being stifled,"
Simmons said. "We believe manufacturers
should not compete on intellectual property;
technology should be in the public domain
so we can all compete on the merits of our
ideas and quality of manufacturing."
With the RRFB's interim approval rescission
and newly issued interim approval, a lot of
attention has been drawn to the wide range
of enhancements available for uncontrolled
pedestrian crossings. The working group ITE
formed to address the RRFB issue has now
evolved into a Pedestrian Crossing Safety
Working Group, which is part of the Ped-Bike
Standing Committee in the Complete Streets
Council. Their first product is a webinar, Engineering the Uncontrolled Pedestrian Crossing,
on May 24, 2:30-4:00 p.m. EDT. The webinar, will feature perspectives from two local
agencies, Seattle, WA and Des Moines, IA, as
well as the Florida Department of Transportation, and how these agencies are addressing
their uncontrolled crossings.  Learn more
and register online through ITE's Learning
Hub at www.pathlms.com/ite/courses/6954/
webinars/3367. itej

By Ed Christopher and Carolyn McAndrews
A desire to protect and enhance public
health has motivated improvements to arterial roads and corridors. There are countless
"on the ground" examples that illustrate
this. In 2016, the Urban Land Institute (ULI)
published a report on its Healthy Corridor
Project describing how four communities
in the United States implemented improvements along specific corridors with the goal
of making positive changes in the health of
the people who live, work, and travel along
them. The improvements targeted health
by expanding the set of relevant issues to
include food access, physical activity, economic opportunities, and affordable housing
in addition to pedestrian and bicycle safety.1
In 2017, ULI added four more sites to its
Healthy Corridor Project. The new sites will
build upon lessons learned from the initial
phase, including the refinement of what
constitutes a "healthy corridor," strategies
to incorporate these elements, and ways to
engage local stakeholders to use a health
lens while revitalizing the areas.2
In 2016, the Federal Highway Administration
(FHWA) released the Health in Transportation Corridor Planning Framework. The
FHWA framework provides action-oriented
information about incorporating health into
the corridor planning process. In addition,
it includes a step-by-step guide for transportation practitioners. Five communities
beta-tested the framework.3
We can point to many other examples of
transportation practitioners integrating
public health into their work, but the examples above are unique because they focus on
arterial roads. When thinking about public
health, arterials are important because
of their intense automobile use, and the
array of health and health equity outcomes

they influence. Perhaps more importantly,
cities and states frequently redesign and
reconstruct arterials which presents timely
opportunities to experiment with and learn
from innovations in health-focused design,
operations, and maintenance strategies.
Coinciding with these high profile efforts to
bring a health lens to corridor and arterial
improvements, in 2015 the Transportation
Research Board's (TRB) Technical Activities
Council voted unanimously to establish a
new task force on the topic-the Task Force
on Arterials and Public Health. The purpose
of the task force is to develop a portfolio
of research needs to inform the planning,
design, and operation of arterial roads while
considering both their positive and negative
health implications.
Of the many topics the task force has discussed, the one that comes up at every
meeting is how to bring health considerations into corridor analysis. Although both
the ULI and FHWA efforts addressed this,
they focused on a high-level policy and
planning perspective. The opportunity now
is to focus on the needs of transportation
engineers, who often manage the technical analysis and implementation of the
policy and planning goals. What seems to
be missing is a way to infuse health-related
metrics and thinking into the analytical and
design processes.
Traffic engineers use a suite of measures and
metrics that typically include:
*
Delay and level of service;
*
Travel time and speed;
*
Peak hour excessive delay;
*
Travel time reliability;
*
Traffic density;
*
Queue length;
*
Crashes, injuries, and fatalities;
*
Fuel consumption and emissions; and
*
Noise.
w w w .i t e.o r g

May 2018

13


http://www.pathlms.com/ite/courses/6954/webinars/3367 http://www.pathlms.com/ite/courses/6954/webinars/3367 http://www.ite.org

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of ITE Journal May 2018

President’s Message
Director’s Message
People in the Profession
ITE News
ITE, FHWA, and Carmanah Rally to Keep Rectangular Rapid-Flashing Beacons in Our Safety Toolbox
Improving Arterial Roads to Support Public Health: How Can We Do This?
ITE’s Transportation and Health Initiative
Technical Programs Division Spotlight
Industry News
Calendar
Where in the World?
Member to Member: Jing Zhang, AICP, PTP, LEED AP ND
Countermeasures Prove Effective in Reducing Bicycle Collisions
Guidance on Signal Control Strategies for Pedestrians to Improve Walkability
Factors Affecting Vehicle Passing Distance and Encroachments While Overtaking Cyclists
Measuring the Success of Modal Shift: The Impact on Last Mile Connectivity
Professional Services Directory
ITE Journal May 2018 - 1
ITE Journal May 2018 - 2
ITE Journal May 2018 - 3
ITE Journal May 2018 - President’s Message
ITE Journal May 2018 - 5
ITE Journal May 2018 - Director’s Message
ITE Journal May 2018 - 7
ITE Journal May 2018 - People in the Profession
ITE Journal May 2018 - 9
ITE Journal May 2018 - 10
ITE Journal May 2018 - ITE News
ITE Journal May 2018 - ITE, FHWA, and Carmanah Rally to Keep Rectangular Rapid-Flashing Beacons in Our Safety Toolbox
ITE Journal May 2018 - Improving Arterial Roads to Support Public Health: How Can We Do This?
ITE Journal May 2018 - 14
ITE Journal May 2018 - 15
ITE Journal May 2018 - 16
ITE Journal May 2018 - ITE’s Transportation and Health Initiative
ITE Journal May 2018 - 18
ITE Journal May 2018 - Technical Programs Division Spotlight
ITE Journal May 2018 - Industry News
ITE Journal May 2018 - 21
ITE Journal May 2018 - Where in the World?
ITE Journal May 2018 - 23
ITE Journal May 2018 - 24
ITE Journal May 2018 - 25
ITE Journal May 2018 - 26
ITE Journal May 2018 - Member to Member: Jing Zhang, AICP, PTP, LEED AP ND
ITE Journal May 2018 - 28
ITE Journal May 2018 - Countermeasures Prove Effective in Reducing Bicycle Collisions
ITE Journal May 2018 - 30
ITE Journal May 2018 - 31
ITE Journal May 2018 - 32
ITE Journal May 2018 - 33
ITE Journal May 2018 - 34
ITE Journal May 2018 - Guidance on Signal Control Strategies for Pedestrians to Improve Walkability
ITE Journal May 2018 - 36
ITE Journal May 2018 - 37
ITE Journal May 2018 - 38
ITE Journal May 2018 - 39
ITE Journal May 2018 - Factors Affecting Vehicle Passing Distance and Encroachments While Overtaking Cyclists
ITE Journal May 2018 - 41
ITE Journal May 2018 - 42
ITE Journal May 2018 - 43
ITE Journal May 2018 - 44
ITE Journal May 2018 - 45
ITE Journal May 2018 - Measuring the Success of Modal Shift: The Impact on Last Mile Connectivity
ITE Journal May 2018 - 47
ITE Journal May 2018 - 48
ITE Journal May 2018 - 49
ITE Journal May 2018 - Professional Services Directory
ITE Journal May 2018 - 51
ITE Journal May 2018 - 52
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