ITE Journal - April 2020 - 33

statewide and Regional Transportation Management Centers
(RTMCs) whose primary purpose is to collect, analyze, maintain,
and disseminate data and information with the express intent to
serve the safety and mobility needs of all road users in real-time.
While CAV may be considered nascent, emerging technologies
have always evolved. The difference is that ITS systems are now
being fully utilized, thereby providing a significant impetus to the
CAV programs.
The emphasis of TSMO strategies has recently advanced the
discussion on the emerging transportation technologies even
further, as TSMO mainstreams ITS by extending it from the
systems and policy planning stage through project development
and environment (PD&E), design, construction, operations, and
maintenance. However, the need for developing a sustainable
funding program is less discussed but equally important, helping
formulate, identify, and prioritize funding availability. When
juxtaposed with the ITS maintenance and operations funding
allocations, programs become institutionalized and lead to
sustainable initiatives that can last beyond the pilot phase of
any project. ITS used to be typically associated with only the
freeway systems. The more recent significant advancements
with traffic signal systems, arterial network, and multimodalism
have expanded the role of ITS to include the active management
of arterial corridors, integrated corridor management (ICM),
transit signal priority (TSP), and freight signal priority (FSP). The
fiber network of the ITS systems is the key component to enable
technology platforms and is thus an important element of CAV
deployments, especially when large volumes of disparate data
need to be transmitted to a central system through a back haul.
Even though the typical CAV equipment such as the road side
units (RSU) and on-board units (OBUs) can be distinguished
from the standard ITS equipment such as dynamic message
signs (DMSs), closed-circuit televisions (CCTVs), highway
advisory radios (HARs), etc., at some point in the future the CAV
equipment will be treated on par with ITS infrastructure.
ITS systems provide ground truthing in real-time, and are at
the forefront in collecting data and information by utilizing the
ITS detectors in the field, the microwave vehicle detection systems
(MVDS), CCTVs, radar systems, and many other sensors. Even
though standards are being developed for the CAV devices and
associated data structures, the existence of adopted standards
for ITS infrastructure help to jump-start any CAV program. For
instance, the 511 programs in various states collect information
that is disseminated to the general public and can be readily
integrated into a potential vehicle-to-everything (V2X) data
platform (vehicular technology that allows a car to communicate
with other cars and infrastructure around it) as is being pioneered
at a few agencies.

RTMCs are an important component of ITS systems and will
play a crucial role in realizing the full benefits of CAV deployments,
which in turn depend on strong ITS networks. Any CAV program
should be seen as being integral to ITS systems at the agency, and
therefore the need for CAV to reside within the traffic engineering
and operations divisions which is also where the operations-led
TSMO and ITS programs are housed. TSMO and ITS focus
on freeway and arterial operations, including traffic incident
management, managed lanes, commercial vehicle operations, and
the traditional traffic engineering practices. Thus, CAV stands to
gain from institutionalization, infrastructure readiness, innovation,
implementation, and ingenuity perspective.

Institutionalization
An empirical review of the transportation practice, particularly at
public agencies and even more so within the operations divisions,
shows the significant role played by individuals who-over time-
may have developed rigorous programs. These champions pioneer
concepts of immediate importance to the agency and the stakeholders with a goal directly or indirectly linked to safety and mobility of
the transportation network. Over time, the efforts of such individual
champions develop into solutions-oriented approaches with
seemingly streamlined programs yet with visible gaps in intra-departmental collaboration and inter-departmental coordination.
Such gaps provide an indication and are symptomatic of program
individualization. Over time, this forms silos and creates barriers for
interested stakeholders to enter and support such systems.
Agency leadership should recognize individualization and
implement preventive practices such as the development of a
second-layer leadership to address the silo effect, failing which
the organization could remain dependent on the champion. These
individuals are also often the technical experts who take up the role
of administrators and managers, an aspect that could either spur
or stifle innovation. Such champions fully embrace technology,
provide space for stakeholders, invite the industry, encourage
research, develop a strong vision, seek and obtain funding, set the
program in motion, develop and implement projects, achieve the
organizational objectives, monitor progress, and develop performance-oriented systems.
On the other hand, a skeptical individual may impede exploring
the utility of emerging technologies, let alone implement the same
to address the safety and mobility concerns. Such professionals
in managerial roles cause a ripple effect by impacting the entire
divisions, departments, and organizations, in at least three aspects:
Safety and Mobility. Not adopting the transportation technologies is counterproductive especially when successful deployments
by other entities do in fact yield quantifiable reductions in traffic
crashes and congestion.
w w w .i t e.or g

Apri l 2020

33


http://www.ite.org

ITE Journal - April 2020

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of ITE Journal - April 2020

ITE Journal - April 2020 - Cover1
ITE Journal - April 2020 - Cover2
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 3
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 4
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 5
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 6
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 7
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 8
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 9
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 10
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 11
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 12
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 13
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 14
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 15
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 16
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 17
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 18
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 19
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 20
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 21
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 22
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 23
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 24
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 25
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 26
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 27
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 28
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 29
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 30
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 31
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 32
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 33
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 34
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 35
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 36
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 37
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 38
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 39
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 40
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 41
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 42
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 43
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 44
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 45
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 46
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 47
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 48
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 49
ITE Journal - April 2020 - 50
ITE Journal - April 2020 - Cover3
ITE Journal - April 2020 - Cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_July2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_June2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_May2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_April2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_March2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_February2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_January2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_December2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G110939_ITE_November2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G110110_ITE_October2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G110109_ITE_September2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G108559_ITE_August2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G108250_ITE_July2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G107225_ITE_June2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G104039_ITE_May2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G104038_ITE_April2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G104036_ITE_March2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G103582_ITE_February2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G102868_ITE_January2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G100155_ITE_December2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G100154_ITE_November2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G99495_ITE_October2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G98028_ITE_September2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G97366_ITE_August2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G96287_ITE_July2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G94315_ITE_June2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G93877_ITE_May2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G93065_ITE_Apr2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G91484_ITE_Mar2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G89434_ITE_Feb2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G86608_ITE_Jan2018
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com