ITE Journal - February 2020 - 30

| inside the industry

By Valerie Lefler,
Executive Director,
Feonix - Mobility
Rising; Teresa
Wilke, Owner,
Silver Arrow
Strategies; and
Shawn Leight, P.E.,
PTP, PTOE (F) Vice
President/COO,
CBB Transportation
Engineers +
Planners

When we think about the potential that mobility as
a service (MaaS) and mobility on demand (MOD)
have for the future of our transportation ecosystems,
many of the puzzle pieces are falling into place. Several
considerations are being addressed simultaneously in
the transportation planning and engineering process,
including safety, travel demand, environmental impact,
pedestrians, micro-transit, traditional transit, private
providers, and asset management. We have a lot of work
yet to do, but are well along the way toward a community and regional vision of success.
However, as we approach this new dynamic of Maas/
MOD we must ensure that we don't forget about the
many dimensions of accessibility that have been limited,
left behind, forgotten, or abandoned over the past 30
years as our transit ecosystems have evolved through a
multitude of budget cuts, changing city/county priorities, and economic shifts. In any given community, we
need to ensure that in our excitement of MaaS/MOD, we
prioritize the voice and needs of those most underserved, including:
* Individuals with disabilities,
* Racial and ethnic minorities,
* Individuals and families living below the poverty
line, and
* Seniors.
As a society, creating the lifeblood of mobility for
today and tomorrow means access to opportunity for
employment, healthcare, education, and basic necessities for those most in need of public transportation.
For example, a 2018 Bureau of Transportation
Statistics report showed an estimated 25.5 million
Americans have disabilities that make traveling outside
the home difficult.1 They accounted for 8.5 percent of
the population ages five and older. An estimated 13.4
million of these Americans-more than half-are adults
age 18 to 64, the age group with typically high labor
force participation.
Further review of the data shows that one-fifth
(22.5 percent) of non-workers with disabilities,
and 12.2 percent of workers with disabilities live in
zero-vehicle households.

30

Fe bruar y 2020

ite j ou rn al

People Living in Zero-Vehicle Households by Disability and
Worker Status (age 18-64).1

25

Workers

Non-workers
22.5%

20

15
12.2%
9.5%

10

5

0

3.9%

Has
disability

Does not
have disability

Has
disability

Does not
have disability

In addition, as our aging population continues to
grow-with one in every five Americans expected to be
65+ by 2020-the provision of safe and accessible transportation options remains a critical public health issue.2
We must engage in human-centered design and
think about our transportation ecosystem from every
angle-cost, travel time, vehicle design, language,
unbanked individuals, technology limitations, service
hours, and the very culture of the leadership in the
transportation authorities who govern and oversee
our communities.
In the standard framework in planning our future
transportation projects, the status quo of holding public
meetings or sending out online surveys is not enough.
We must engage community health workers, social
workers, case managers, community leaders, and individuals who are facing mobility challenges themselves
in meaningful and deep discussions-not just once, but
multiple times. As transportation leaders, we must have
the hard conversations, address the deep wounds the
community bears, and unwind the miles and miles of
red tape to get to the heart of the matter.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, 2017 National Household Travel Survey

Making MaaS/MOD Accessible
in 2020 and Beyond



ITE Journal - February 2020

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of ITE Journal - February 2020

ITE Journal - February 2020 - Cover1
ITE Journal - February 2020 - Cover2
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