ITE Journal - February 2020 - 44

a paid internship! This effort is a proactive stance against income,
racial, ethnic, and process/participation inequities.

Engage With Senior Citizens and Older Adults
Approximately sixteen percent of the U.S. population is age 65
and older; that percentage is expected to rise to nearly a quarter
of the population by 2050.2 As the aging population continues to
increase, engineers and planners must be more intentional about
engaging with and involving seniors. According to Smart Growth
America's 2019 Dangerous by Design Report, "Compared to younger
victims of pedestrian deaths, older adults who are struck and killed
while walking are more often at an intersection or in a crosswalk."
To change this narrative moving forward, it is imperative that
engineers and planners engage with senior citizens and older adults
to fully understand their behavior and usage differences as well as
transportation challenges and needs. This effort is a proactive stance
against life-stage and process/participation inequities.

Engage With Persons with Disabilities and
Special Health Care Needs
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
61 million adults in the United States live with a disability. The
highest percentage of this population lives in the South-the same
geolocation that has higher shares of older adults, people of color,
and pedestrians in low-income communities disproportionately
represented in vehicular traffic deaths, according to Smart Growth
America. It is also important to note the various functional
types of disabilities, (i.e., mobility, cognition, independent living,
hearing, vision, and self-care) and the fact that adults living with
disabilities are disproportionately more likely to be obese and live
with a chronic disease, such as heart disease and diabetes than
their counterparts. Both engineers and planners have an obligation
to persons with disabilities and special health care needs to fully
understand their behavior and usage differences, as far too often
these professionals do not take into account the various types of
disabilities nor the importance of the social environment as it
relates to the build environment. For instance, persons with disabilities are just as concerned with personal violence as they are traffic
violence. This effort is a proactive stance against ability inequities.

Engage with foreign born and Limited English
Proficiency (LEP) populations
Those born outside of the United States currently make up
approximately 14 percent of the population. Of that percentage,
half are from Latin America and nearly one-third are from Asia.
Considering how rapidly U.S. demographics are changing, it is
vital that engineers and planners invest time, effort, and resources
to engage with and become more knowledgeable of these diverse
cultures and their respective languages. Doing so would ideally lead
44

Fe bruar y 2020

ite j ou rn al

to the development of meaningful and authentic relationships and
a better understanding of their collective and individual transportation challenges and needs. This effort is a proactive stance against
language and cultural inequities.

A discussion by Charles Brown on Bike Share Equity and Access in
Baltimore, MD, USA.

Engage with Sexual Minorities
Discussions on the various types of social identities, specifically
sexual minorities, and how they relate to, inform, and are impacted
by transportation decisions rarely happen in our industry, and when
they do, they are usually followed by confused faces and deafening
silence. This should concern engineers and planners considering
how one's identity can result in various degrees of mistreatment,
harassment, and even death in our streets-particularly for those
whom are transgender women of color. A September 2019 article in the
New York Times revealed that "at least 18 transgender people-most
of whom were people of color-had been killed in a wave of violence
that the American Medical Association has declared an epidemic."3
The rise in killings and violence against these groups, as well as the
unjust harassment from police, have led transgender people to fear
doing anything outside their households. To change this narrative
moving forward, it is imperative that engineers and planners engage
with sexual minorities to fully understand their behavior and usage
differences, and safety concerns. This effort is a proactive stance
against gender, cultural, and process/participation inequities.

Engage with and Promote Women to
Positions of Power
Slightly more than half of the U.S. population identifies as female.
However, with a few exceptions, the voices of women at engineering
and planning meetings, conferences, seminars-and in many other
industries-are almost always dominated or silenced by that of
men. Additionally, municipal, county, regional, state and federal
transportation departments as well as for-profit and non-profits
businesses and organizations are disproportionately headed and
managed by men. As a result, we have manifested-intentionally
or not-a male-centric, male-dominated built environment and
culture that does not fully consider or respect the needs of women.
To change this narrative moving forward, it is imperative that



ITE Journal - February 2020

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of ITE Journal - February 2020

ITE Journal - February 2020 - Cover1
ITE Journal - February 2020 - Cover2
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 3
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 4
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 5
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 6
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 7
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 8
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 9
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 10
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 11
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 12
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ITE Journal - February 2020 - 14
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 15
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 16
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ITE Journal - February 2020 - 18
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 19
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 20
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 21
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ITE Journal - February 2020 - 23
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ITE Journal - February 2020 - 26
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ITE Journal - February 2020 - 28
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 29
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ITE Journal - February 2020 - 43
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ITE Journal - February 2020 - 49
ITE Journal - February 2020 - 50
ITE Journal - February 2020 - Cover3
ITE Journal - February 2020 - Cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ite-journal-april-2021
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_Mar2021
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_Jan2021
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_Dec2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_Nov2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_Oct2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_Sept2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_Aug2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_July2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_June2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_May2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_April2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_March2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_February2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_January2020
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/ITE_December2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G110939_ITE_November2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G110110_ITE_October2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G110109_ITE_September2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G108559_ITE_August2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G108250_ITE_July2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G107225_ITE_June2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G104039_ITE_May2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G104038_ITE_April2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G104036_ITE_March2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G103582_ITE_February2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G102868_ITE_January2019
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G100155_ITE_December2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G100154_ITE_November2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G99495_ITE_October2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G98028_ITE_September2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G97366_ITE_August2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G96287_ITE_July2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G94315_ITE_June2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G93877_ITE_May2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G93065_ITE_Apr2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G91484_ITE_Mar2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G89434_ITE_Feb2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G86608_ITE_Jan2018
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