ITE Journal - July 2020 - 34

Focusing on Safety and People
Giving prominence to people walking and biking aligns with
the city's commitment to Vision Zero, which aims to eliminate
fatal and severe injuries on our streets by 2027. People walking
and biking are overrepresented in severe and fatal crashes in
Minneapolis, with people biking and walking comprising 19
percent of all trips in the city but 45 percent of all fatal and severe
injuries. Minneapolis is currently lowering speed limits citywide to
20 miles per hour (mph) (32 kilometers per hour [km/hr]) on most
residential streets and 25 mph (40 km/hr) on most other city-owned
streets, supporting Vision Zero efforts and a move to support safer
and more comfortable trips for people walking and biking.
67%

20

IS PLENTY

55%

SLOWER IS SAFER

4%
16%

visionzerompls.com
stpaul.gov/speedlimits

15%
29%
% of Trips

% of Severe Injuries/Deaths

Source: Injuries/deaths from Vision Zero Crash Study, percent of trips from 2010 Met Council Travel Behavior Inventory. Automobile category includes cars, trucks, motorcycles, but not transit.

Figure 5. People walking and biking are disproportionately killed or suffer
a severe injury from traffic crashes on Minneapolis streets.

Focusing on Equity and People
Equity translates to fair and just opportunities and outcomes for all
people. Minneapolis is committed to the development of policies,
practices, and strategic investments to reverse racial disparity
trends, eliminate institutional racism, and ensure that outcomes
and opportunities for all people are no longer predictable by race.4
Transportation is a critical part of this work.
Not all people have the same access to transportation. More
than one of every six people in Minneapolis (16.5 percent) live in a
household without an automobile.5 In some neighborhoods as many
as 40 to 50 percent of households don't have access to a vehicle.
While some households choose not to own a car, there are many
households that cannot afford to do so. Transportation is one of the
top two household costs, accounting for approximately 19 percent
of household income in Minneapolis.6
One of the goals of the draft plan is to reduce single occupancy
and high-carbon motor vehicle trips. The current transportation
network affords more opportunities to those who can purchase a
car, such as access to more jobs. To design, build, and operate an
equitable transportation system, it is imperative that we focus on
34

J u ly 2020

Figure 6. "20 is plenty" yard sign helps spread message of
city's new lower speed limits as part of its Vision Zero work.

ite j o urn al

underserved communities that are in need of expanded, improved,
and affordable mobility options.
Additionally, 11 percent of Minneapolis residents self-report
a disability, which may present mobility challenges.7 Given these
realities, the existing transportation system results in different
challenges for different people. The approach to our work
recognizes these realities and will help address them.

​​​​​​Draft Plan Helped Prepare for Rapid
Mobilization during COVID-19
In part due to the solid policy foundation leading up to and
cultivated during the development of the draft Transportation
Action Plan, including stakeholder engagement, workgroups with
agency partners, and internal coalescing around the approach
to reaching citywide goals, the City of Minneapolis was well
positioned to react once COVID-19 hit. The city was able to rapidly
respond to changing demands and travel patterns on our streets
due to the pandemic. The week after the draft plan was released,
schools shut down throughout the city, many workers started
working remotely, and shortly thereafter stay-at-home orders were
issued by the governor. The Public Works Department quickly
worked to implement numerous activities that helped people stay
safe, businesses thrive, and keep people connected. Three main
components of this work have been to implement the following:


http://www.visionzerompls.com http://www.stpaul.gov/speedlimits

ITE Journal - July 2020

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of ITE Journal - July 2020

ITE Journal - July 2020 - Cover1
ITE Journal - July 2020 - Cover2
ITE Journal - July 2020 - 3
ITE Journal - July 2020 - 4
ITE Journal - July 2020 - 5
ITE Journal - July 2020 - 6
ITE Journal - July 2020 - 7
ITE Journal - July 2020 - 8
ITE Journal - July 2020 - 9
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ITE Journal - July 2020 - 34
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ITE Journal - July 2020 - Cover3
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https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G100155_ITE_December2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G100154_ITE_November2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G99495_ITE_October2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G98028_ITE_September2018
https://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G97366_ITE_August2018
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