Principal - September/October 2019 - 7

Fast Fact: Absenteeism and its ill effects start early. One in 10 kindergarten and first-grade students
are chronically absent. www.attendanceworks.org

digital tool was presentation and
productivity programs such as
Google G Suite for Education
and Microsoft Office.
Teachers place a high value on
digital creation tools in developing 21st century skills, but these
tools are among the least used
in the classroom. Productivity
and presentation tools, digital
creation tools such as iMovie and
Photoshop, and learning management systems such as Google
Classroom and Moodle were rated
as the most effective digital tools
for developing students' skills in
communication, collaboration,
critical thinking, and creativity.
3. The gap between education technology products teachers use and
what they say is effective is real-
and it cuts across subjects. The
report cites an example: English
language arts (ELA) teachers
rated productivity and presentation tools and assistive technology
as the most effective types of
digital tools for developing ELA
content knowledge and skills, but
many of them used other digital
tools they rated as less effective
with greater frequency
Another example: Math teachers rated supplemental apps and

websites as the most effective digital tools for developing students'
content knowledge and skills in
math, but they used them less
often than other digital tools
they rated as less effective.
4. Many teachers are not receiving
effective professional development to support their use of
education technology. According
to the survey, only 40 percent
considered the professional
development they've received
to support their use of education technology to be "very" or
"extremely" effective.
5. Many technology products purchased by schools and districts
go unused. About one-third
of teachers said they did not
use or practically never used a
technology product the school
or district provided them. Why?
Because the products were not
relevant to students' learning,
not engaging for students'
learning, or not effective in
developing students' skills.
To read the full list of findings
and detailed teacher and
school characteristics, visit the
Common Sense Media website:
www.commonsensemedia.org.

Kristen Breedlove (@kbreedlove1984): We can encourage our staff
to expand their PLNs by sending them to conferences/PD, creating
opportunities to collaborate/learn with other schools, hosting
Twitter chats, inviting them to leadership functions, and getting
them out in the community.
Jillayne Flanders (@jillflanders): You, the school leader, set the
example. And then you make mistakes and think through them
together. This is culture-building. You make time for teachers to
talk, informally observe each other, get out of the building, wonder,
wander, and discover.
Amanda Funk (@techieteach11): Every time a bell rings, a teacher in
my school created a Twitter account! [It's] music to my ears [and]
opens up a WORLD of resources!
www.naesp.org

Improving
Attendance
Regular school attendance is a major
factor in student success. Those with
chronic absenteeism are more likely to
fall behind in reading, score lower on
standardized tests, fail to graduate from
high school, and not attend college.
To improve attendance takes a village of students, families, faculty, and
administrators. These four tips are a
good place to start:
1. Enlist a team. Assign a team of
teacher leaders to a group specifically tasked with paying close
attention to attendance trends by
focusing on data, parent engagement activities, student behavior,
and family support systems.
2. Understand-and actually use-
data. District data can supplement
the data you record in your school.
3. Communicate with families.
Don't wait until there's a problem
to address it. Communicate frequently with students' families via
social media, a digital newsletter, or
in-person meetings.
4. Make sure students know what's at
stake. Get creative when it comes
to letting students know just how
much regular attendance increases
their chances of success in life.
Share the Word

This year, NAESP is proud to partner
with Attendance Works, a national and
state initiative that pushes for better
policy and practice to improve school
attendance. Join us in September as we
celebrate Attendance Awareness Month.
Find links to tools and resources you
can put to use right away in your school
on the Attendance Works website:
attendanceworks.org.

Principal n September/October 2019

7


http://www.attendanceworks.org http://www.commonsensemedia.org http://www.twitter.com/kbreedlove1984 http://www.twitter.com/jillflanders http://www.twitter.com/techieteach11 http://www.attendanceworks.org http://www.naesp.org

Principal - September/October 2019

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Principal - September/October 2019

From the Editor
Snapshots
5 Things
Getting to Why
A Brighter Future for Personalized Learning
Models of Voice and Choice
When Rural Gets Personal
Research Roundup: The Personal Touch
New Sensation
The Language of Learning
Giving Back, Together
In the Spotlight
Practitioner’s Corner
Early Career
Raising the Bar
The Reflective Principal
Speaking Out
Parents & Schools
NAESP Partners & Advertiser Index
Principal - September/October 2019 - Cover1
Principal - September/October 2019 - Cover2
Principal - September/October 2019 - 1
Principal - September/October 2019 - 2
Principal - September/October 2019 - 3
Principal - September/October 2019 - From the Editor
Principal - September/October 2019 - 5
Principal - September/October 2019 - Snapshots
Principal - September/October 2019 - 7
Principal - September/October 2019 - 5 Things
Principal - September/October 2019 - 9
Principal - September/October 2019 - Getting to Why
Principal - September/October 2019 - 11
Principal - September/October 2019 - 12
Principal - September/October 2019 - 13
Principal - September/October 2019 - 14
Principal - September/October 2019 - 15
Principal - September/October 2019 - A Brighter Future for Personalized Learning
Principal - September/October 2019 - 17
Principal - September/October 2019 - 18
Principal - September/October 2019 - 19
Principal - September/October 2019 - Models of Voice and Choice
Principal - September/October 2019 - 21
Principal - September/October 2019 - 22
Principal - September/October 2019 - 23
Principal - September/October 2019 - When Rural Gets Personal
Principal - September/October 2019 - 25
Principal - September/October 2019 - 26
Principal - September/October 2019 - 27
Principal - September/October 2019 - Research Roundup: The Personal Touch
Principal - September/October 2019 - 29
Principal - September/October 2019 - New Sensation
Principal - September/October 2019 - 31
Principal - September/October 2019 - The Language of Learning
Principal - September/October 2019 - 33
Principal - September/October 2019 - 34
Principal - September/October 2019 - 35
Principal - September/October 2019 - Giving Back, Together
Principal - September/October 2019 - 37
Principal - September/October 2019 - 38
Principal - September/October 2019 - 39
Principal - September/October 2019 - In the Spotlight
Principal - September/October 2019 - 41
Principal - September/October 2019 - Practitioner’s Corner
Principal - September/October 2019 - 43
Principal - September/October 2019 - Early Career
Principal - September/October 2019 - 45
Principal - September/October 2019 - Raising the Bar
Principal - September/October 2019 - 47
Principal - September/October 2019 - The Reflective Principal
Principal - September/October 2019 - 49
Principal - September/October 2019 - 50
Principal - September/October 2019 - 51
Principal - September/October 2019 - Speaking Out
Principal - September/October 2019 - 53
Principal - September/October 2019 - Parents & Schools
Principal - September/October 2019 - NAESP Partners & Advertiser Index
Principal - September/October 2019 - 56
Principal - September/October 2019 - Cover3
Principal - September/October 2019 - Cover4
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