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Employee Engagement Continued from page 15 organization. The foundation for engagement is in believing that what he does is meaningful. At the opposite end of the spectrum, it might be equally easy to visualize an actively disengaged employee. This is the employee who may be a “problem” or a “misplaced” employee. She has negative feelings and attitudes and most likely has problems getting along with other people. She may not perform to her potential simply because of boredom or fatigue. The actively disengaged employee is in a rut. People who do not seek new learning opportunities, either within the organization or a professional association, could also quickly become problem employees. These individuals could be experiencing serious problems (personal or otherwise) or may not have found a job that fits their talents. The disengaged employee is much harder to spot than the previous two descriptions. This employee is doing what is expected of him, but nothing more. He clocks in at the requested time; puts in the requested hours; fulfills the requested job requirements; but offers nothing more. This employee will not go over and above to build a relationship with co-workers or customers. The disengaged employee is disconnected from organizational priorities, often feels underutilized and is clearly not getting what he needs from work. He is likely to be skeptical and can indulge in contagious negativity. He may be collecting a paycheck while complaining or looking for his next job. If the organization does not deal with him, other engaged employees may have to work harder and may grow resentful. Employee Trends The Employee Engagement Report (2011 Blessing White, Inc.), found that fewer than one in three employees are engaged. And Gallup’s engagement ratio of the average working population of “engaged” to “actively disengaged” employees is nearly 2:1 with a mere 33% of employees being engaged. Within the U.S. workforce, Gallup estimates this cost to the bottom line to be more than $300 billion in lost productivity. Businesses in the top quarter of employee engagement have: 12% higher customer advocacy 18% higher productivity Businesses in the bottom quarter of employee engagement have: 31-51% more turnover 62% more accidents (not an option in aviation!) The top reason given for being engaged at work is that engaged employees “stay for what they give,” meaning they like their work and are able to contribute. Actively disengaged employees stay for what they get, such as a secure job in an unfavorable employment market, a desirable salary or bonus, favorable job conditions or career advancement. The Business and General Aviation (B&GA) industry is unique from other industries in several ways. Most people who work in this industry are in it because they feel a strong admiration for airplanes, flying, and all things aviation. This could be advantageous for B&GA Engaged Works with passion and feels a profound connection (alignment of values, goals and aspirations) to their organization. Non Engaged Does what is expected. Actively Disengaged Unhappy and busy acting out their unhappiness. organizations in attracting engaged employees. But it is important for aviation leaders not to be complacent and hope that employees will remain in a state of engagement. Executives must create a work environment that drives high performance. Engagement is not just about what employees feel; it is about what they can accomplish every day. How-to Boost Employee Engagement in the Workplace Some things individual employees can do to remain personally engaged include: ■■ Link work to a larger purpose ■■ Act in alignment with the organization’s core values or guiding principles Continued on page 18 Aviation Business Journal | 3rd Quarter 2011 17

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Aviation Business Journal Third Quarter 2011

Aviation Business Journal Third Quarter 2011

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